BIRMINGHAM (205) 769-6355   HUNTSVILLE (256) 270-8160 Monday - Friday 8 - 5.    Sat / Sun by appointment only.

FAQ

Golf car batteries operate to their fullest potential if they are charged after every use. Running batteries down low shortens their life span and also puts a strain on the electrical components of the drive train. Not having enough power to turn the motor over makes the motor, controller, FNR switch, and solenoid work harder.

Batteries in your golf car are connected in a series, one to another, by cables. In order to get the best performance from your golf car (that is, all 36- or 48-volts of power) you need to have good connections across each battery.

Anytime you have dirt, grass or residual battery acid on your batteries, you have the potential for these contaminants to collect in areas where cables need to have good contact with terminals. That is bad! On the other hand, dirt and corrosion could also provide a path for current to flow outside the designated path, thereby allowing the batteries to self discharge. Either way, that is not good.

Wash your battery tops every week or so (more frequently if needed). Corrosion damage caused by poor maintenance is a major factor in golf car failure. A little water under the seat won’t hurt the components of your golf car, but don’t shoot water straight at the electrical components. And be sure all battery caps are on tightly. Speaking of battery connections...

Batteries are connected by 6-guage wire with 5/16 terminals that hook onto the battery posts. Each negative connects to a positive. Cables should be kept intact and tightly connected to the battery posts at all times. Torque to 70 inch-pounds initially and re-torque as needed to 65 inch-pounds. If you have any room for vibration on the battery terminal at all, you can melt the post and render the battery useless, kaput, history.

YES! This is a common problem. Overfilling the batteries can result in shortening their useful life. The best thing an owner can do is to purchase the Battery Filling System from an authorized E-Z-Go dealer. The Battery Filling System can be purchased and installed on new and used golf cars.

Golf cars usually take anywhere from 2-8 hours to charge depending on how long it was used for and what kind of load you had on the car.

Yes. As your batteries age, they will require water more often and have longer charging times. They may also have a higher finish rate (amperage at the end of a charging cycle). Capacity also decreases over time. To extend the life of your batteries, be sure to keep them free of debris, keep the water at the appropriate level, charge your golf car as needed and do not stress the system by running your golf car on a low charge.

You might want to check your tire pressure. Tire pressure affects the performance of your car. You want it to be anywhere from 20-22 PSI on a golf car and 10-15 PSI on a lifted vehicle. Another way to find out is to check what the recommended PSI is on the tire itself.

On both the E-Z-Go and ClubCar brands, that switch is the Tow/Run switch. This switch is only on PDS or the IQ-system golf cars. The speed on these cars is controlled by a speed sensor that is connected to the motor. If something goes wrong with the golf car, you move the switch from run to tow and tow the vehicle at a very low speed. Not putting it from run to tow and towing it can cause substantial damage and is very costly to fix.

Count the number of water holes:
3 holes = 6 volts
4 holes = 8 volts
6 holes = 12 volts

You need a converter to go from 48- or 36-volt to 12-volts. That way it draws power off all of the batteries equally. Otherwise, eventually your golf car will not run right since one or two batteries will be dead. None of them will charge properly until those batteries are individually charged to match the others.

Yes, your golf car can be customized in dozens of different ways - colored bodies, custom seats, custom tires and rims, radio, MP3 player and speaker system, lights, turning signals, etc. Contact us for availability and pricing options.

This term is used loosely but you need to understand that it is difficult to make a golf car truly street legal in terms of safety, lights, etc. We do not certify that any golf car is street legal after you make modifications and caution you against thinking that simply adding lights, horn, and a few other options meets the State or Federal definition of "street legal" and do not advise you driving your golf car on public roads.

We can sell you a Low Speed Vehicle that are certified by the manufacturer as "street legal" if that is what you desire

The real answer is - it depends. Most buyers using the vehicle in a neighborhood or residential setting prefer electric. Buyers using the vehicles for heavy personal or industrial use - such as on a farm pulling or carrying heavy loads, long distance travel over rough terrain, etc. - prefer gas. Hunters are split in both camps as some like electric for the quietness while others prefer gas for ability to travel long distances without worrying about losing their battery charge. We can help you make the right choice for your intended use.